Fanning and Politics
A writer is a person who cares what words mean, what they say, how they say it. Writers know words are their way towards truth and freedom, and so they use them with care, with thought, with fear, with delight. By using words well they strengthen their souls. Story-tellers and poets spend their lives learning that skill and art of using words well. And their words make the souls of their readers stronger, brighter, deeper.
Ursula K. Le Guin (via writingquotes)
dulldrops:

jpanicattack-in-the-tardis:

Is it just me or does Ezra Miller actually have one of the nicest profiles?

dulldrops:

jpanicattack-in-the-tardis:

Is it just me or does Ezra Miller actually have one of the nicest profiles?

I wanted to know as much as possible. It was something that Jane encouraged. She said to me, ‘You’ve got to become our expert on John Keats so that if anybody has a question about him or his work, you can answer it.’ And I took her word. I kind of did become a bit of an expert. I read everything I could get my hands on, about him. I read about four biographies and all of his letters, all of his poetry, obviously, and then kind of critical studies—stuff that wasn’t even especially pertinent to the film, but I got kind of carried away and really addicted to knowing more and more about him.

lustforlife13:

wearitcounts:

say it with me now

there is nothing disrespectful about queer readings of characters in classic literature

there is nothing disrespectful about queer readings of characters in classic literature

there is nothing disrespectful about queer readings of characters in classic literature

There is nothing disrespectful about queer readings of characters in classic literature


From Science Daily
Going Through the Motions Improves Dance Performance
July 23, 2013 — Expert ballet dancers seem to glide effortlessly across the stage, but learning the steps is both physically and mentally demanding. New research suggests that dance marking — loosely practicing a routine by “going through the motions” — may improve the quality of dance performance by reducing the mental strain needed to perfect the movements.


The new findings, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggest that marking may alleviate the conflict between the cognitive and physical aspects of dance practice, allowing dancers to memorize and repeat steps more fluidly.
Researcher Edward Warburton, a former professional ballet dancer, and colleagues were interested in exploring the “thinking behind the doing of dance.”
"It is widely assumed that the purpose of marking is to conserve energy," explains Warburton, professor of dance at the University of California, Santa Cruz. "But elite-level dance is not only physically demanding, it’s cognitively demanding as well:
Learning and rehearsing a dance piece requires concentration on many aspects of the desired performance.”
Marking essentially involves a run-through of the dance routine, but with a focus on the routine itself, rather than making the perfect movements.
"When marking, the dancer often does not leave the floor, and may even substitute hand gestures for movements," Warburton explains. "One common example is using a finger rotation to represent a turn while not actually turning the whole body."
To investigate how marking influences performance, the researchers asked a group of talented dance students to learn two routines: they were asked to practice one routine at performance speed and to practice the other one by marking.
The routines were relatively simple, designed to be learned quickly and to minimize mistakes. Yet differences emerged when the judges looked for quality of performance.
Across many of the different techniques and steps, the dancers were judged more highly on the routine that they had practiced with marking — their movements on the marked routine appeared to be more seamless, their sequences more fluid.
The researchers surmise that practicing at performance speed didn’t allow the dancers to memorize and consolidate the steps as a sequence, thus encumbering their performance.
"By reducing the demands on complex control of the body, marking may reduce the multi-layered cognitive load used when learning choreography," Warburton explains.
While marking is often thought of as a necessary evil — allowing dancers a “break” from dancing full out — the large effect sizes observed in the study suggest that it could make a noticeable difference in a dancer’s performance:
"Marking could be strategically used by teachers and choreographers to enhance memory and integration of multiple aspects of a piece precisely at those times when dancers are working to master the most demanding material," says Warburton.
It’s unclear whether these performance improvements would be seen for other types of dance, Warburton cautions, but it is possible that this area of research could extend to other kinds of activities, perhaps even language acquisition.
"Smaller scale movement systems with low energetic costs such as speech, sign language, and gestures may likewise accrue cognitive benefits, as might be the case in learning new multisyllabic vocabulary or working on one’s accent in a foreign language."

From Science Daily

Going Through the Motions Improves Dance Performance

July 23, 2013 — Expert ballet dancers seem to glide effortlessly across the stage, but learning the steps is both physically and mentally demanding. New research suggests that dance marking — loosely practicing a routine by “going through the motions” — may improve the quality of dance performance by reducing the mental strain needed to perfect the movements.


The new findings, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggest that marking may alleviate the conflict between the cognitive and physical aspects of dance practice, allowing dancers to memorize and repeat steps more fluidly.

Researcher Edward Warburton, a former professional ballet dancer, and colleagues were interested in exploring the “thinking behind the doing of dance.”

"It is widely assumed that the purpose of marking is to conserve energy," explains Warburton, professor of dance at the University of California, Santa Cruz. "But elite-level dance is not only physically demanding, it’s cognitively demanding as well:

Learning and rehearsing a dance piece requires concentration on many aspects of the desired performance.”

Marking essentially involves a run-through of the dance routine, but with a focus on the routine itself, rather than making the perfect movements.

"When marking, the dancer often does not leave the floor, and may even substitute hand gestures for movements," Warburton explains. "One common example is using a finger rotation to represent a turn while not actually turning the whole body."

To investigate how marking influences performance, the researchers asked a group of talented dance students to learn two routines: they were asked to practice one routine at performance speed and to practice the other one by marking.

The routines were relatively simple, designed to be learned quickly and to minimize mistakes. Yet differences emerged when the judges looked for quality of performance.

Across many of the different techniques and steps, the dancers were judged more highly on the routine that they had practiced with marking — their movements on the marked routine appeared to be more seamless, their sequences more fluid.

The researchers surmise that practicing at performance speed didn’t allow the dancers to memorize and consolidate the steps as a sequence, thus encumbering their performance.

"By reducing the demands on complex control of the body, marking may reduce the multi-layered cognitive load used when learning choreography," Warburton explains.

While marking is often thought of as a necessary evil — allowing dancers a “break” from dancing full out — the large effect sizes observed in the study suggest that it could make a noticeable difference in a dancer’s performance:

"Marking could be strategically used by teachers and choreographers to enhance memory and integration of multiple aspects of a piece precisely at those times when dancers are working to master the most demanding material," says Warburton.

It’s unclear whether these performance improvements would be seen for other types of dance, Warburton cautions, but it is possible that this area of research could extend to other kinds of activities, perhaps even language acquisition.

"Smaller scale movement systems with low energetic costs such as speech, sign language, and gestures may likewise accrue cognitive benefits, as might be the case in learning new multisyllabic vocabulary or working on one’s accent in a foreign language."

owlsstuff:

More irresistible owls here: http://ift.tt/JQ5da3 Photo source (http://ift.tt/1nRto4U)

owlsstuff:

More irresistible owls here: http://ift.tt/JQ5da3 Photo source (http://ift.tt/1nRto4U)

sourwolvesandsarcasm:

LET IT HAPPEN ALREADY

sourwolvesandsarcasm:

LET IT HAPPEN ALREADY

jennybel75:

hedwig-dordt:

johnlocklives:

I’ve just seen these photos of Ben C from the Gala Screening and something caught my eye…

image

..where have I seen this jacket before??

Hmmm…..

Oh. Oh.

image

THEY EITHER SHARE CLOTHES OR BENEDICT COSPLAYS JOHN WATSON NO ONE WILL CONVINCE ME OTHERWISE

He cosplayed Moriarty in his Star Trek press junkets, so I’m not all that surprised

Not quite the same jacket. John’s is from Barbour I believe, while Benedict’s is definitely from Belstaff

…the more you know :)

fightyourdragon:

Title: Possibly I Like The Thrill

Words: 89,118

Relationships: Past tense Victor/Sherlock, Sherlock/John, John/Sherlock/Mary

Tags: Touch-Starved, Cuddling & Snuggling, Developing Relationship, Conversations, Light Dom/Sub, Fluff & Smut, Polyamory, F/M/M, Oral Sex, Penetrative Sex

Summary: Sherlock misses John. John misses Sherlock. Victor Trevor, Sherlock’s oldest friend (and a super nice guy in this version) and participant in the ‘great sexual experiment of ‘98’ shows up to cuddle the hell out of a touch-starved Sherlock, get him talking, and get those two idiots back together. He’ll work on Mary later. One fucked-up couple at a time is all he can handle.

All the thanks in the world to hedwig-dordt for her many hours of help with beta work and general encouragement! Well it took months but now that it’s finished I rather adore the way it turned out. I hope you enjoy it as well! 

Super adorable Christmassy coda. Brush your teeth, you might get cavities. (this was a blast)

roane72:

what-alchemy:

venneh:

fuck-me-barnes:

drop-deaddream:

Bucky enrolls in a college course about Captain America. It doesn’t go well.

Or, the one where James Barnes writes a ludicrously inappropriate academic paper in defense of Steve’s virtue. Complete with red-penning from a professor whose slow descent into madness is beautifully apparent and a formal letter of apology from Cap himself that doesn’t milk their sad poor orphan status at all, what are you talking about, Captain America would never do that.

I cried laughing. Guys, please. Love yourselves. Read Buck’s foray into academia. And have a few feelings too. 

I read this at work and legit was trying to suppress laughter so bad that tears were in my eyes, which then leaked out and fucked up my eyeliner all over my eyelid

in short this furthered my progression into the winter soldier

go read the thing

#OH MY G OD#NO MATTER HOW MANY TIMES YOU ARGUE IT YOU ARE NOT A SUITABLE PRIMARY SOURCE#THIS ISNT ABOUT ME MR BARNES#WHY WOULD YOU HAND THIS IN#YOUR FRIENDS ARE NOT SOURCES#STOP MENTIONING YOURSELF#’he doesn’t understand what size his t-shirts should be’ oh my GOD#if that doesn’t sum up Steven Grant Rogers in one sentence idk what even does#oh Bucky baby#you are a treasure#lmao

WHAT

This is FANTASTIC. If you’re vaguely academic at all, go read. :)